lauantai 6. elokuuta 2022

PictureCorrect.com: Travel Photography Planning and Tips

How many times have you come back from a trip disappointed with the images you’ve taken? How many times have you though to yourself, “If only I’d been there an hour earlier. If only I’d known that event was on today.” While it is true that hindsight makes everyone smarter, and no one can control the weather, it is possible to maximize your chances of success just by doing a little homework.

travel photo planning

“Reflections” captured by meenakshi madhavan

Plan your trip

There is a major difference between planning to take photos on your travels, and traveling to take photos. This will be evident in the images you produce. Spend some time researching your destination and its photographic potential. Is it a place affected by the seasons? If so, when is the best time of year to go? How are you going to get there? What is the public transport like? Should you hire a car? Answering these questions can take you a long way to a successful shoot. For example, you may be grateful you decided to get that international drivers license once you get back and look through those beautiful sunset shots you took off a beaten track a few miles from town because you were able to hire a car and drive out there.

There are numerous resources available on the Internet and in print, most of them free. An hour or so online can provide a wealth of information, not to mention inspiration. A pocket travel guide can also be an invaluable investment as a reference to have at your fingertips as you go.

street market image

Photo captured by Nicolas Lannuzel

Make a shoot list

Think about the locations you want to shoot. Which landmarks do you want to visit? What time of day do they appeal to you? Are you interested in capturing your location’s architecture or its culture? Or both? Deciding all of this in advance can give you clear goals to aim for on your trip, rather that simply wandering the streets and shooting whatever you come across that you find appealing. This may prove successful but is more about luck than anything else.

Be flexible

What happens if you get there and the weather suddenly turns sour? Do you wait it out in your hotel room hoping it will pass before you are due to return home? What a waste of time that would be. If you are planning to travel somewhere that can be greatly affected by weather, you might want to think about how you can use this to your advantage. Some subjects can be greatly enhanced by sudden changes to the weather, or even just the threat of it. Imagine missing out on a sweeping panorama of a storm rising over the bay because you were sitting in a room cursing your bad luck.

planning a photo trip

“Istanbul a moment” captured by PictureSocial member giovanna tucker

It is possible for anyone to point a camera at a subject and take a picture. Not all can use that camera to tell a story or teach something to a viewer. Apart from technical skills and, to a much lesser extent, equipment, the difference comes down to planning. The most important factor in the success of your photographic journey is the goals you set for yourself and the steps you take in achieving them.

About the Author
Mark Eden is a freelance travel photographer and writer, and the founder and director of ExpansePhotography, a photographic services company offering fine art, limited edition prints as well as stock and assignment photography and publishing services. Mark can be contacted through the Expanse Photography website.

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PictureCorrect.com: Interesting Photo of the Day: Oregon Coast

Oregon has to be one of the most beautiful places in the U.S. What makes it interesting are the different biomes and microclimates you can find in the region. For instance, while Western Oregon is typically wet, Eastern Oregon is more of a large steppe. The coastline, meanwhile, is a mixture of sandy beaches, sand dunes and massive cliffs. When photographer Austin was traveling along the northernmost part of the Oregon coast, he took the following image around Astoria. The image gives a hint of how much like paradise the place really is:

northern coast in Oregon

“Beautiful Oregon Coast” by Austin (Via Reddit. Click image to see full size.)

“It was the main spot in Oregon that I didn’t get to explore on my last trip here a couple of years back, and it’s been on my bucket list ever since. Glad to see it for myself.”

While this image shows an angelic side of the place, you cannot ignore how risky it must also be. In fact, as Austin notes, he nearly fell off a rock climbing up to snap this image. Of course, adventures like that make being a nature photographer so worthwhile. But you can never take safety for granted.

The image is composed quite well, as the path of the water acts as a subtle natural leading line and draws us right into the image through the cliffs. There’s also a magical glow that makes the scene mystical. Thanks to the mist, the light makes the image appear like its glowing.

Wouldn’t you love to spend some time here?

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PictureCorrect.com: Butterfly & Insect Photography Tutorial

Photographing insects is a daunting task. The subjects are tiny, skittish, and you have no control over them. Another challenge is the shallow depth of field of macro lenses. Chances are very high that your shot will be out of focus, even if the insect barely moves. Photographer Ross Hodinott explains how you can overcome the challenges of macro insect photography in this video:

Finding Insects

“It doesn’t really matter where you live. You’re never going to be far from insects.”

One good thing about photographing insects is that you don’t have to travel too far to find them. You can find them in your own backyard. If you happen to have wetlands, meadows, or reserves in your vicinity, those are great places to find insects.

looking for insects nearby wetlands for macro photography

Once the location is sorted out, it’s about finding your subjects. Weather conditions play an important role, too. Insects tend to come out and get more active when the weather is sunny and warm. This can make your work challenging because of the increased level of activity of the insects. On the other hand, when the sun is low during the early morning and evening, they’re less active, making it favorable for you to take their photos.

Once you notice an insect, study its behavior. Territorial insects tend to return to the same area. In that case, be patient and be prepared to photograph in that particular area. And when you’re approaching the insect to photograph it, keep from disturbing the surrounding grass/branches, and also be sure not to cast your shadow on them.

Composition

“A good composition will greatly depend on your subject and the kind of effect you’re trying to achieve.”

Hodinott’s key to good composition is to keep things simple and not to cram a lot of elements in a frame. He also suggests that you leave a little bit of space to include the surroundings instead of filling the frame entirely with the insect. This gives a sense of scale and context.

macro photo of a dragonfly with context

Choosing a Lens

Macro lenses are the best choices when it comes to photographing tiny subjects from a close distance. They’re optimized for close up images and can resolve minute details superbly. But, if you’re on a budget, you can get away with using close-up filters and extension tubes. They help you to take close up images using your existing lenses.

If you’re getting yourself a macro lens, it is a good idea to invest in a telephoto macro lens. Using a macro lens with a greater focal length, 200mm, for instance, provides you with a greater working distance. This minimizes the risk of you disturbing the insect, as you can maintain a good distance from the subject.

“Any macro lens over 100mm is a really good lens for macro photography.”

Focusing

“One of the most challenging aspects of insect photography is achieving sharp images.”

When shooting at high magnifications, the depth of field becomes extremely shallow. You need to nail focus in order to achieve a detailed image. If you’re not careful enough, you could miss focus even by a hairline, and the image will not come out great.

If you have a larger subject, you can get away with auto-focus. However, if your subject is small, or if you’re shooting at a high magnification ratio, auto-focus won’t cut it. It will be very slow and inaccurate. The best solution is to work in manual focus mode.

using manual focus in macro photography

If you’re not well-versed with using manual focus in macro photography, it can be a nightmare out in the field. Hodinott suggests the following steps for nailing focus using manual focus:

  1. Set the lens to the level of magnification you want for your particular subject.
  2. When the insect is in place, look through the viewfinder and slowly move forward until the subject is in focus.
  3. Once you feel that the subject is sharp enough, take a short burst of images in continuous mode.

“You end up gently rocking backwards and forwards, and every time your subject comes through the focal plane, take a shot.”

Aperture is another important aspect that dictates how much of the subject is in focus. And unfortunately, there is no concrete answer to which aperture value you should be using. It depends on the size of the subject and the type of effect you’re aiming for.

“I tend to shoot with the largest aperture that I can get away with in order to achieve a fairly shallow background and also to generate a relatively fast shutter speed.”

Ethics

When photographing insects, treat them like you would treat any other subject. Some photographers restrain the insects for the sake of a photograph. Always put your ethics first. Try to photograph the insects in their environment.

Lighting

You actually don’t get to have control over light when photographing insects during the day. However, if you’re out photographing them during the evening, you can start manipulating light. Hodinott carries a small reflector and an LED light with him that he uses to add in a creative backlight. And if the light is too harsh, you can use a diffuser to soften it.

lighting tools for macro photography

“Ultimately, there is absolutely no substitute for beautiful golden sunlight. And that’s one of the reasons why I do most of my insect photography either early in the morning, or late in the evening when the light  is naturally beautiful.”

macro photo in natural light

If you’re thinking of trying your hand at macro photography, be sure to give these tips a shot.

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perjantai 5. elokuuta 2022

PictureCorrect.com: 📱 Released Today: Capture it All iPhone Photo Course

Did you know that most people use less than 10% of the iPhone camera? Imagine using less than 10% of your car. Pretty silly, huh? So why do the same with your iPhone? This new course, Capture it All, is designed to show photographers EVERYTHING an iPhone camera can do. During the launch sale today they are currently letting in new students at 90% off if you want to check it out. Launch sale ending soon: Capture it All at 90% Off

capture it all

New: Capture it All Course (see preview videos)

Some iPhone camera features are hidden. Others are confusing. Most take YEARS of practice to get them right. And the user manual is nowhere to be found. So how can you master everything your iPhone camera can do?

You could spend 10 years traveling. Keep shooting every day for hours. Make all the beginner mistakes. Until you know the iPhone camera inside out.

That’s exactly what Clifford Pickett did…

And 10 years later brands like Clinique, British Airways, and National Geographic hire him for high-budget projects…

Using nothing but his iPhone!

Or you could try the first online course to cover it all.

Learn at your own pace. Anywhere in the world:

  • 65 videos
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Instructors you can trust:

  • 10+ years in business
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iphone photo tutorials

Lifetime access

5 Free Bonuses During the Launch Sale:

  1. Shooting Videos Tutorials – Life happens in motion. Why stop at capturing still images? Cinematic shots. Settings. Gimbals. Video editing. A studio in your pocket. Memories for a lifetime. Value: $99
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  3. Travel Photo eBook – Capture It All Free Ebook. You probably take photos while traveling. But how do you capture the essence of a place? Or show what it feels like to visit a destination? Find out how in this bonus eBook. Value: $99
  4. Photo Assignments – You’ll discover so much in this course. But true mastery is only possible if you try out the same techniques yourself. 25 optional homework assignments will help you practice everything you’ve learned. And get feedback from your fellow students! Value: $149
  5. Private Community – Join thousands of iPhone photography students in their private Facebook community. Share your work. Get feedback. Stay inspired. Get a free lifetime membership.

How to Get a Discount Today:

During its launch this weekend, the brand-new course is on sale at a deeply discounted price. It also includes a full happiness guarantee, if you are not satisfied with the course for any reason simply let them know for a full refund – so there is no risk in trying it.

Launch sale ending soon: Capture it All In-depth Course at 90% Off

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PictureCorrect.com: Interesting Photo of the Day: Tunnel Di Pini, Italy

Tunnel Di Pini, just outside of Pisa in Italy, is often hailed as one of the best tree tunnels in the world. For photographers in the area, its hard to resist. Even non-photographers will love the mile-long walk among the epic, ancient trees. If you have no idea about the place, just have a look at the following image taken by photographer TJ Drysdale. If this image doesn’t make you feel like visiting the place, we don’t know what will:

a girl running in Tunnel Di Pini

“Tunnel Di Pini, Italy” by TJ Drysdale (Via Reddit. Click image to see full size.)

As you can see, the beautiful arrangement of trees is really something. It looks like a fairy tale.

Besides the beautiful location, the way Drysdale has taken the photograph is pretty amazing as well. An excellent choice was getting the subject to wear a bright-colored dress: she stands out beautifully from the surroundings thanks to her outfit.

Then there’s the pose that adds so much value to this image. Her innocent pose, running into the woods, emits vibes of youth, joy and an embrace of nature. Although we cannot see her face, she sure seems to be excited and happy to be there.

Wouldn’t you love to visit the place?

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PictureCorrect.com: Teleconverters: Things Photographers Should Know

A teleconverter is a small secondary lens unit that is placed between the camera body and the lens. It is useful to increase your reach as it increases the apparent focal length of your lens. This is great for those who cannot afford long lenses, or those who shoot primarily wildlife. However, there are a few things you should be aware of before purchasing a teleconverter. In today’s video, photographer Jared Polin sheds some light on the matter:

“Where most people go wrong with teleconverters is they don’t realize the cause and effect it has on their settings.”

Brands market teleconverters by promising they will help increase your lens’s reach. But what they won’t tell you is that there are a lot of downfalls to this. A lens is a great piece of engineering designed with the intention of projecting the clearest image on the sensor. Introducing any optical element, either in front of the lens or in between the lens and the sensor, can only hamper the quality.

Like Polin demonstrates in the video, the first thing you will immediately notice is a loss of light. For instance, a 2x teleconverter means a 2-stop loss of light. And this is just the beginning. To compensate for the loss, you will need to increase your ISO, which will invariably introduce noise. So if you’re thinking of getting a teleconverter for some fast-action sports or wildlife photography, you seriously need to consider all of these variables.

Moreover, the setup’s performance will also take a hit as the loss of light causes the lens to focus slower. As Polin clearly shows in the video, there is a clear loss of sharpness. If image clarity is critical, you’d be better off avoiding a teleconverter and cropping the image instead.

“Don’t waste your money on a teleconverter thinking it will give you great results—because it won’t.”

For an in-depth analysis of how teleconverters can affect your photography, be sure to watch the complete video. And if you use teleconverters for your photography, we’d love to hear your experience as well.

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