maanantai 15. lokakuuta 2018

PictureCorrect.com: Interesting Photo of the Day: Ocean Wave Swan

Nature can surprise us in many ways. Take the following image, for instance. Australian photographer Matt Burgess took a photo of a wave that looks like a swan, and it’s absolutely amazing:

wave that looks like a swan

Swan in an Ocean Wave (Via Reddit. Click image to see full size.)

It’s not just the overall shape of the wave that looks like a swan but also the textures and details that remind us of the beautiful creature. Not to mention the wonderful lighting from the sun and the cloudy sky that adds further drama to the image.

Mother Nature really is amazing, isn’t she?


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PictureCorrect.com: How to Get Started with Product Photography

Peter McKinnon, a professional product photographer, often receives products in the mail from his customers, who ask him to take photos. His love for textures and the use of odd props is what make his images come together and stand apart from the crowd:

Themes, Textures, and Props

When deciding how to photograph your product, break the shoot down into three distinct sections: themes, textures, and props.

product photography themes and textures

McKinnon goes to great lengths for finding props that offer him plenty of creative flexibility. For example, for the cast iron puzzle he was shooting, he went to an antique store and looked for old, metal props to accent it.

Investment

Of course, the time and money spent on these rusty, worn out textured props can be stretched further.

investment

McKinnon chooses items that can be used again in future shoots, so his purchases are an investment.

Tools for Product Photography

McKinnon uses a macro lens and natural light for the shoot.

product photography tools

He demonstrates that it’s necessary to shoot inside an expensive studio or use very expensive tools to achieve professional results.

How do you set up your product photography shoots? Do you have a process that works?


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PictureCorrect.com: 9 Amazing Benefits of Photography

With the proper camera and vision, photography can make your life much better. Below are just a few of the many benefits of developing a love of photography.

benefits of photography

“Young Photographer” captured by Muha

1. Photography affords immortality

Don’t believe it? Look at all the old photographs your mom or grandmother had around. I personally have a picture in my china cabinet of a newly married couple in 1911, and I have no idea who it is. (No, Cousin Ann, I don’t care to know.) I mean, it has their names on the back, but I’m not quite sure just where in the family tree they belong. I just think it’s cool. They looked so stiff and formal back then! It sure is different than how we take such natural pictures today. I personally will be immortalized laughing or smiling in many pictures.

photography memories

1911 Wedding Portrait, Carl & Nellie (via flickr/josh phillipson)

2. Photography documents your journey through life

From your childhood pictures to your child’s pictures to your grandchild’s pictures. From first smiles to first steps to first dates, life can be documented and preserved. Photography captures personal communication that would otherwise be lost forever.

Many times I’ve noticed something in a photograph that wasn’t apparent when I was snapping the picture. Sometimes it’s a look on a child’s face or an arm around a lover or something that would have been lost forever if not captured in that very moment in time.

child portrait

“Quanto ci costa sorridere?” captured by Andrea Floris

So, whether it’s that child saying “Puhleeeese, I’m soooo sick of you taking these stupid pictures” or the lover feeling that “connectedness” right at that very moment they both are conveyed for eternity. Captured. Never to be lost.

3. Photography is a wonderful stress reliever

I mean, really, how much can you concentrate on that all-consuming problem when you turn your focus instead to the petals of a flower, the wings of a butterfly, the graceful curves of a majestic mountain, or the dimples of a smiling baby?

butterfly on flower

“Monarch Butterfly” captured by Shandi-lee Cox

Go ahead. Take your blood pressure before and after spending just 30 minutes focusing on getting that perfect picture. You’ll be amazed at the difference.

Then, for better overall health, just rinse and repeat often. It’s okay. I promise the problem won’t go away. It’ll still be there when you’re ready to start worrying again.

4. Photography inspires your imagination

My sister is a professional photographer and her creativity while taking photographs of the kids is what moved her (slowly) toward a career as a photographer. She loves finding and replicating such creative poses as a newborn in a net seemingly hanging from the sky. She also loves taking a couple and creating romantic ways for the shared love to be shown.

engagement photography

“Engaged” captured by Bùi Linh Ngân

It has inspired my own creativity, as I help her come up with new ideas. For instance, one day I was walking on a road with plenty of random cracks in it. The sun was behind me casting my shadow forward. We were talking on the phone about how to capture this one particular couple and the strength of their union and I mentioned the cracks all around them (symbolizing life in general). However, when it came to their shadows, they were solid. In this way it showed the strength of the union as well as how life couldn’t “crack” them.

5. Photography as a career is possible for anyone with a true passion for it

There are people who make a living being a photographer. Imagine, if you will, that every picture you’ve ever seen, whether it’s on a billboard, in a magazine, or on TV, was snapped by someone. There are schools, classes, books, and websites where you could learn much more than I could ever tell you. Remember, you have your whole life in front of you. Why not aim for a part-time career on the side?

6. Photography is a wonderful, safe, and natural self-esteem booster

My 14 year-old loves the feeling of pride she gets when she takes pictures of her friends and they turn out good. When she downloads and sees them on the computer she’s in seventh heaven. And, of course, she loves sharing them with her friends.

7. Photography brings you closer to your natural spirituality

Look around at the wonders of nature. Whether you believe in God or not, you can’t help but feel a stirring at the beauty surrounding you. You simply can’t help but understand how very small you are while you are realizing how very vast everything else is.

nature photography

“Rainbow Valley” captured by Roy Wangsa

8. Photography lets you see things that you may never notice otherwise

When I look at something I can’t possibly take in every aspect that is within my vision. For instance, a beautiful sunset only lasts so long and I may not notice all aspects of how the colors play on the water (I live in a beach town). The look of the sand (such a simple thing) changes as the sun lowers. All of these aspects are much more evident in a picture, and I can concentrate on the overall view while knowing that the individual components will not be lost forever.

beach sunset

“Gong Beach Sunset” captured by Tony Heyward

9. Photography preserves new and old memories

Think of the wife or husband who has lost a spouse. Or the child who lost a parent. With pictures not only can they have no fear of forgetting their loved one’s face but can remember exactly what was going on when that picture was snapped, cementing the memory forever.

These are only a few of the many, many benefits of photography. They are so many, it would be impossible to fit them into one article. What’s your favorite benefit of photography?

About the Author:
Mary Segers (theremustbeabetterway.net) is a home time management expert and coach.


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sunnuntai 14. lokakuuta 2018

PictureCorrect.com: Interesting Photo of the Day: A Boy and His Big Best Friend

A dog is a boy’s best friend. Especially when it’s bigger than you are:

dog and little boy portrait

A boy and his dog in “Followed,” captured by Elena Shumilova (Via Imgur)

In this charming photo by Elena Shumilova, a very large dog follows a very small boy through a sunlit field. Captured during what photographers refer to as “the golden hour”—the first or last hour of sunlight during the day—this photo depicts the warm glow that lends such a special quality to photos taken during this time.

Entitled “Followed,” this photo was taken with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II with a focal length of 135mm at f/2.2, a shutter speed of 1/500 of a second, and an ISO of 200.


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PictureCorrect.com: Tips to Photograph the Moon

Space is fantastic. And what better opportunity to practice photographing spatial bodies than with our closest neighbor: the moon. Photographer Jay P. Morgan presents his tips and tricks on how to photograph the moon:

Timing

In order to photograph the moon in its full glory, you might be naturally tempted to shoot during a full moon. However, when it is a full moon, the sunlight is hitting the moon straight on. This causes the details on the face of the moon, that is, the craters, to be less visible. Hence, Morgan suggests that you plan your shoot a day before or after the actual full moon. The side lit moon will have greater details.

Location

The rise and set cycle of the moon is less precise than that of the sun. Every evening, the moon can rise around 50 minutes late. You therefore need to use some kind of tool to keep track of the moon. Morgan suggests using the app “Moon Seeker” for the purpose. The app will let you know when the moon will be rising, and also tell you where the moon will be at what time of the night. Morgan uses this feature of the app to identify when the moon will be on top of the skyline. This allows for better planning so that you can get your gear and setup ready well ahead.

using the moon seeker app

Using the moon seeker app to locate the moon

Exposure Settings

If you photograph the moon directly when it has risen up, your settings will be comparable to when you take a photo during day time. But if you try to shoot it when it is low at the horizon, it will seem pretty dark. This is because the light has to pass through all of our atmosphere. So you will need to adjust your exposure settings depending on the moon’s location.

Camera Setup

Morgan uses two cameras to photograph the moon. On one camera, he uses his Tamron 24-70mm lens. This lens allows him to get a wider perspective as well and get some part of the lake in front of him. On the other camera, he uses his Tamron 70-200mm lens to get a tighter shot of the moon with the top of the buildings. This two camera setup will also come in handy as you will not get enough time to change the lenses. This is due to the fact that the moon will move pretty fast and will only be in the area where you need it for 15 to 20 minutes.

You will also notice that Morgan uses tripods while setting up the cameras. Tripods are especially necessary when using longer lenses to reduce any kind of camera shake. You can further reduce camera shake by using some kind of triggering device to release the shutter remotely. Morgan uses a MIOPS Mobile Remote to control his camera through his smartphone and release the shutter remotely. And if you are concerned about the mirror in your DSLR causing camera shake, you can lock the mirror as well. This is especially useful if you are using a really long focal length.

remote mobile release

MIOPS Mobile Remote for remote shutter release

To maintain a proper color balance Morgan suggests that you keep the white balance set to auto. He also prefers to shoot in aperture priority mode with the aperture set at f/4 instead of f/2.8. While he prefers to meter with the exposure compensation set at -2/3, he also keeps an eye on every shot to see how the exposure is changing. He then makes necessary changes to the exposure compensation depending on how the exposures are coming out.

photograph of the moon

So the key here is to understand when and where the moon will be rising and to be prepared with you gear to capture it. However, at times you cannot predict the weather, and clouds may interfere with your photo shoot. Don’t lose hope! You can give it another try next month.


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lauantai 13. lokakuuta 2018

PictureCorrect.com: Interesting Photo of the Day: Breathtaking Sandstone Passage in Arizona

This breathtaking view of one of Arizona’s most famous rock formations was captured by Nicholas Roemmelt, a dentist-turned-nature-photographer who is based in Tyrol, Austria:

mirrow wave arizona sandstone rock formation nicholas roemmelt jurassic reflection

“Mirror Wave” by Nicholas Roemmelt (Via 500px. Click to see full size.)

This picturesque sandstone passage, which is called “The Wave,” can be found at Arizona’s Vermillion Cliffs National Monument and was carved out over millions of years by the raging flash floods that sweep through deserts after thunderstorms. Roemmelt created this image shortly after just such a thunderstorm that thankfully left a small pool of water in its wake. To achieve his vision, he used a Canon EOS 1 DX camera at 19mm, 1/13 of a second, f/16, and ISO 100.

Roemmelt often visits the United States and considers the country’s state and national parks to be some of his favorite locations for photographing landscapes and wildlife.

“I like to roam around in the mountains of Tyrol, from the valley up to the highest glacier peaks, because you can find an amazing amount of ‘wilderness’ there. If I, however, [am looking] for more ‘wilderness,’ I’m usually in the far north of Scandinavia [or in] a United States National Park.” — Roemmelt


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PictureCorrect.com: Photography: What Are You Trying To Say Here?

Really, when you’re taking a picture what are you trying to communicate?

Sometimes you’re just trying to record events. “This is me standing in front of the Eiffel Tower.” “Here we are at Niagara Falls.” Other times it’s the beauty of nature or a person that you’re attempting to show.

That said, there’s a great deal of difference between a wedding picture of a bride standing straight as a board facing the camera with direct light and her feet cropped off by the camera and a photo of a bride standing on stone steps with a pillar to her side, her train trailing off in the same direction that she’s looking. And low sunlight casting its warm glow over everything.

what are you trying to say with your photos

Photo by John Schilling

Both are pictures of the bride. One says “Yeah, I got married, so what?!” The other speaks of love and eternity. Here’s the kicker, though. Maybe what you want to communicate is the “So, what?” idea. If you’re going to do that, you can shoot funny or serious, angry or sad. Have her in a kitchen chair with a bottle (or can) of cheap beer.

Do you want to take a picture of your subject—in this case a person—standing rigidly in front of the place visited? Or could you make it a little more interesting by somehow getting the person involved? Use a wide angle lens to show the kids looking out over Niagara Falls or your mom gazing up at the Eiffel Tower.

Or when you’re at the ball game use that same wide angle lens to show your seven year old hanging on the fence worrying at the final hour (OK—“final minute”). In this way, with the youngster, you can communicate the sadness of a loss or the exhilaration of a win. Timing and planning can be everything with pictures like this. It may take trying at ten ball games to get the shot you want. But if you know what you want to communicate you’ll be thinking how to position yourself at that little league game so that you get that perfect picture that really says it.

Back to the travelogue. Remember that you very likely are going to show these pictures of France or Bali or Niagara Falls to at least one or two friends. Really. If you’re taking pictures, then please show them even if it is on Facebook. If you like where you went it may inspire someone else to go there or at least dream of going there. And even that is worth a good picture. If you liked where you were then make the pictures show it. If it was hot and dreary, well, how can you show this? If you’re not sure then Google “make a photo look hot and dreary”. Then if I decide to go there I will make sure to bring a hat or go in the cooler season. Or both. Let the picture communicate what the experience was. Don’t just put a head in the picture and then have to tell the story. It’s OK to tell the story if the picture is also doing the same. It’s like in a movie, where the set, music, and dialogue all each on their own convey a mood.

Taking a minute before you start taking the picture or even planning it a bit may feel silly. You may think, “I’m not a professional and they’re not that important.” But honestly what you have to say is important. You can take a picture on the beach with the sun at its zenith, faces in shadow with hats, sunglasses and eyes squinting or you can go have dinner and a drink, relax for a few hours, and come back and take some really beautiful pictures in the evening. Take a picture of your wife or husband looking at the sunset. Not at the camera. If it’s a low warm light, it will flatter the person. Your friends who see the picture when you get back will know that it was taken at sunset even if they don’t see the sun—I promise.

If you’re shooting sports or some activity with lots of motion, do you want to show the motion and speed or do you want to stop it dead? You will have to know the settings on your camera to create these different effects. Do you want blur or no blur? You’re going to have to figure out some settings on your camera as they will be different for each. You can take the shots of the football game or soccer match using program mode and some may come out OK, but if you really want to freeze the motion or show a blur of speed then you’ll have to use shutter priority and aperture priority settings. Most cameras have these. Again figure out what you want to ‘say’. Try them. Experiment.

The first time you use aperture priority you may find that the shutter speed is too slow and everything is so blurry that all the shots are trash. Adjust accordingly for next time. Edison made hundreds of light bulbs before he got it right. But if that’s what you’re trying to communicate then work at it until you get it right. I’ll listen.

photography tips for trying to portray something in a photo

Photo by Philippe Put

This is another reason I suggest you take pictures of children from low down; go to their eye level or body level. This communicates an entirely different ‘feel’ than taking a shot from three feet up and them with their necks craned looking up at you. Get down to their level and take a picture of the child involved in something. Playing with his or her toys or making something. Hands dirty, face a mess. You will often like these more than the pictures that you get in the studio with everyone sitting all proper like. But again it’s what you desire to communicate or say with your picture.

It is your communication. The more you practice the better I will understand it.

Good luck and have fun with it!

About the Author:
Martin writes for photo-photo.com and is based in Calgary, Alberta.


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